Report Wire - Judges don’t face ballot, however individuals are watching: Rijiju

Report Wire

News at Another Perspective

Judges don’t face ballot, however individuals are watching: Rijiju

3 min read
Government for system change to fill up judicial vacancy

Express News Service

NEW DELHI:  Union regulation minister Kiren Rijiju on Monday threw one other barb on the judiciary, saying although judges don’t face public scrutiny or polling like politicians, individuals are positively watching and forming opinions primarily based on their efficiency.

Speaking at a Delhi Bar Association occasion, Rijiju mentioned, “Judges don’t have to face elections. They are also not subjected to public scrutiny. Although the public can’t elect judges, they are watching them. Their judgments, the way they work and the manner in which they dispense justice, people are looking and are also forming an opinion. In the age of social media, nothing can be hidden.”

After Chief Justice of India D Y Chandrachud’s request for imposition of restrictions on social media towards adversarial feedback on judges, the Centre is contemplating to take stern steps, he mentioned, however puzzled what could possibly be carried out if the criticism is on a “mass scale”. “CJI told me that there should be some restrictions on social media. CJI asked us to take some stern steps against people who are commenting on judges. We are considering it. But when people are criticising at a  mass scale, what can we do?” Rijiju requested.

Reiterating that his letter to the CJI dated January 6, didn’t search authorities nominees on the collegium, he mentioned it was meant as a comply with up of the SC’s verdict within the NJAC case. “I wrote a letter to CJI on 6th Jan… Nobody knew about this for 2/3 days but someone got to know and the headline was that law minister has written a letter to CJI for government representatives in collegium…. Collegium consists of five judges, how can I add someone else in the collegium?” Rijiju requested. He mentioned the Centre respects the judiciary as its independence is totally mandatory for democracy. “If the dignity of judiciary is lowered, then it can’t be protected,” he mentioned.

NEW DELHI:  Union regulation minister Kiren Rijiju on Monday threw one other barb on the judiciary, saying although judges don’t face public scrutiny or polling like politicians, individuals are positively watching and forming opinions primarily based on their efficiency.

Speaking at a Delhi Bar Association occasion, Rijiju mentioned, “Judges don’t have to face elections. They are also not subjected to public scrutiny. Although the public can’t elect judges, they are watching them. Their judgments, the way they work and the manner in which they dispense justice, people are looking and are also forming an opinion. In the age of social media, nothing can be hidden.”

After Chief Justice of India D Y Chandrachud’s request for imposition of restrictions on social media towards adversarial feedback on judges, the Centre is contemplating to take stern steps, he mentioned, however puzzled what could possibly be carried out if the criticism is on a “mass scale”. “CJI told me that there should be some restrictions on social media. CJI asked us to take some stern steps against people who are commenting on judges. We are considering it. But when people are criticising at a  mass scale, what can we do?” Rijiju requested.

Reiterating that his letter to the CJI dated January 6, didn’t search authorities nominees on the collegium, he mentioned it was meant as a comply with up of the SC’s verdict within the NJAC case. “I wrote a letter to CJI on 6th Jan… Nobody knew about this for 2/3 days but someone got to know and the headline was that law minister has written a letter to CJI for government representatives in collegium…. Collegium consists of five judges, how can I add someone else in the collegium?” Rijiju requested. He mentioned the Centre respects the judiciary as its independence is totally mandatory for democracy. “If the dignity of judiciary is lowered, then it can’t be protected,” he mentioned.